Session Title

Religious Thinking in Secular Literature

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Mae Lyons-Penner

Organizer Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Presider Name

Mae Lyons-Penner

Paper Title 1

The Sacred and Profane Identities in Twelfth-Century Settler Writing

Presenter 1 Name

Stefan Vander Elst

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of San Diego

Paper Title 2

Exempla Collection Meets Grail Romance: The Dialogus miraculorum and the Deranged Cistercianism of the Perlesvaus

Presenter 2 Name

Adrian McClure

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Purdue Univ.

Paper Title 3

Reading like a Virgin: Pious Women in English Literature of the Fifteenth Century

Presenter 3 Name

Stacie Vos

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of California-San Diego

Start Date

9-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1140

Description

In a recent Speculum article, “In the Name of Charlemagne, Roland, and Turpin” (April 2019), Adrian McClure calls for scholars to “be attentive to religious semiotics as a key way of generating meaning [...] across the entire field of medieval textuality” [465]. Our panel seeks to respond to this call by bringing together new research examining the religious forms and contents of the so-called ‘secular’ literature of the Middle Ages: epics, romances, love songs, comic tales, chronicles, satires, etc. Although the porous boundary between the worldly and the spiritual spheres of medieval life has long been acknowledged, and the mutual influence of devotional and profane genres demonstrated, ‘secular’ literature is still often siloed and its relationship to religious thought and practice understudied. In this panel, we invite those who focus on ‘secular’ writings to reread them from a theological standpoint, and/or reconsider their place within the medieval religious imaginary.

Mae Lyons-Penner

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Religious Thinking in Secular Literature

Schneider 1140

In a recent Speculum article, “In the Name of Charlemagne, Roland, and Turpin” (April 2019), Adrian McClure calls for scholars to “be attentive to religious semiotics as a key way of generating meaning [...] across the entire field of medieval textuality” [465]. Our panel seeks to respond to this call by bringing together new research examining the religious forms and contents of the so-called ‘secular’ literature of the Middle Ages: epics, romances, love songs, comic tales, chronicles, satires, etc. Although the porous boundary between the worldly and the spiritual spheres of medieval life has long been acknowledged, and the mutual influence of devotional and profane genres demonstrated, ‘secular’ literature is still often siloed and its relationship to religious thought and practice understudied. In this panel, we invite those who focus on ‘secular’ writings to reread them from a theological standpoint, and/or reconsider their place within the medieval religious imaginary.

Mae Lyons-Penner