Session Title

Making the Medieval Matter: Teaching the Middle Ages across K-16 (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

K-12 Committee, Medieval Academy of America

Organizer Name

Sarah B. Lynch

Organizer Affiliation

Angelo State Univ.

Presider Name

Michael Burger

Presider Affiliation

Auburn Univ.-Montgomery

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Haya Bacharouch

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Dearborn Public Schools

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Ann F. Brodeur

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Mary

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Kara Larson Maloney

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Canisius College

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Lane J. Sobehrad

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Texas Tech Univ.

Paper Title 5

Discussant

Presenter 5 Name

John T. R. Terry

Presenter 5 Affiliation

The Westminster Schools

Start Date

9-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1045

Description

This roundtable brings together educators from across the K-16 spectrum with experience in college-level instruction and private and public schools. We will discuss how we make medieval topics "matter" to the students, and why students focus on some themes but avoid (or misunderstand) others. We will also consider strategies within (and outside) the classroom and how we need to appeal to students, families, and administrators in promoting medieval studies across curricula and disciplines. Sarah B. Lynch

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Making the Medieval Matter: Teaching the Middle Ages across K-16 (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1045

This roundtable brings together educators from across the K-16 spectrum with experience in college-level instruction and private and public schools. We will discuss how we make medieval topics "matter" to the students, and why students focus on some themes but avoid (or misunderstand) others. We will also consider strategies within (and outside) the classroom and how we need to appeal to students, families, and administrators in promoting medieval studies across curricula and disciplines. Sarah B. Lynch