Session Title

Poets and Astronomers

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Studies in the Age of Chaucer

Organizer Name

Michelle Karnes

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Presider Name

Michelle Karnes

Paper Title 1

Poets, Astronomers, and Commentators

Presenter 1 Name

Kara Gaston

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 2

Cosmic Exempla in Paradiso and the Prick of Conscience

Presenter 2 Name

Ellen K. Rentz

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Claremont McKenna College

Paper Title 3

"This Is False": Bread, Milk, and Early Readers of Chaucer's Astrolabe

Presenter 3 Name

Joe Stadolnik

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 4

Equatorial Poetics

Presenter 4 Name

Lisa H. Cooper

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

Start Date

10-5-2020 8:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2016

Description

Medieval poets and astronomers shared an interest in the stars, and they knew it. Dante chats with philosophers about the cosmos in the Comedy while Chaucer devotes himself to its instruments. At the same time, Sacrobosco, in a text often used as an astronomy textbook in the Middle Ages, appeals to poets and takes their writings on the topic seriously. This session will focus on the intimate relationship between the two disciplines. Is there something inherently poetic about the motion of the stars, according to medieval writers? What special authority do poets have on the topic? Does the modern division between science and the humanities apply to the Middle Ages? Michelle Karnes

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May 10th, 8:30 AM

Poets and Astronomers

Fetzer 2016

Medieval poets and astronomers shared an interest in the stars, and they knew it. Dante chats with philosophers about the cosmos in the Comedy while Chaucer devotes himself to its instruments. At the same time, Sacrobosco, in a text often used as an astronomy textbook in the Middle Ages, appeals to poets and takes their writings on the topic seriously. This session will focus on the intimate relationship between the two disciplines. Is there something inherently poetic about the motion of the stars, according to medieval writers? What special authority do poets have on the topic? Does the modern division between science and the humanities apply to the Middle Ages? Michelle Karnes