Session Title

Bi- and Tri-Lingual Manuscripts and Early Printed Books

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Early Book Society

Organizer Name

Martha W. Driver

Organizer Affiliation

Pace Univ.

Presider Name

Martha W. Driver

Paper Title 1

English Women's Bilingual Manuscripts: Latin AND (not OR) the Vernacular

Presenter 1 Name

Caitlin Branum Thrash

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville

Paper Title 2

Multi-Lingual Apocalypses in Late Medieval England

Presenter 2 Name

Karen Gross

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Lewis & Clark College

Paper Title 3

Words for God: Latin and French in the Fourteenth-Century Books of Hours

Presenter 3 Name

Oleksandr Okhrimenko

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Taras Shevchenko National Univ. of Kyiv

Paper Title 4

"Bremschet Scripcit": A Multilingual Female(?) Annotator of Stephen Scrope's Letter of Othea

Presenter 4 Name

Sarah Wilma Watson

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Haverford College

Start Date

7-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1120

Description

Speakers will discuss works written in more than one language in the same volume or volumes, as well as texts made for and by women. Books of Hours and Apocalypse MSS that combine Latin with French will be among those considered. Medieval writers and scribes crossed linguistic boundaries and were often adept in two or more languages, confident to compose and write in them, suggesting sometimes specific linguistic choices for types of text along with assumptions that readers would be equally skilled. Martha W. Driver

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May 7th, 1:30 PM

Bi- and Tri-Lingual Manuscripts and Early Printed Books

Schneider 1120

Speakers will discuss works written in more than one language in the same volume or volumes, as well as texts made for and by women. Books of Hours and Apocalypse MSS that combine Latin with French will be among those considered. Medieval writers and scribes crossed linguistic boundaries and were often adept in two or more languages, confident to compose and write in them, suggesting sometimes specific linguistic choices for types of text along with assumptions that readers would be equally skilled. Martha W. Driver