Session Title

Gendered Networks in Early Medieval Narratives

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval and Ancient Research Centre, Univ. of Sheffield (MARCUS); Women, Conflict and Peace: Gendered Networks in Early Medieval Narratives

Organizer Name

Máirín MacCarron; Julia Hillner

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. College Cork; Univ. of Sheffield

Presider Name

Peter Darby

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Nottingham

Paper Title 1

Women and Networks in Early Medieval Sources

Presenter 1 Name

Máirín MacCarron

Paper Title 2

Complex Networks and History: Uses and Perspectives

Presenter 2 Name

Silvio Renato Dahmen

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. Federal do Rio Grande do Sul

Paper Title 3

Gender, Names, and Networks: Unnamed Women and Church History in Late Antiquity

Presenter 3 Name

Julia Hillner

Start Date

7-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1120

Description

Read in an analogous way, early medieval texts often seem to reduce women’s social role to either sowing conflict between or reconciling men. This is demonstrated, for example, by the use of the term ‘peaceweavers’ for royal women who marry outside their kingdoms. Historians have often followed such indicators to argue that the primary social expectation of early medieval women was to connect men. The papers in this session will demonstrate how new developments in social network analysis and in literary studies allow us to challenge existing stereotypes and analyse the roles of early medieval women anew.

Mairin MacCarron

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May 7th, 10:00 AM

Gendered Networks in Early Medieval Narratives

Schneider 1120

Read in an analogous way, early medieval texts often seem to reduce women’s social role to either sowing conflict between or reconciling men. This is demonstrated, for example, by the use of the term ‘peaceweavers’ for royal women who marry outside their kingdoms. Historians have often followed such indicators to argue that the primary social expectation of early medieval women was to connect men. The papers in this session will demonstrate how new developments in social network analysis and in literary studies allow us to challenge existing stereotypes and analyse the roles of early medieval women anew.

Mairin MacCarron