Session Title

The End of Game of Thrones in History and Literature

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Elizabeth A. Terry-Roisin

Organizer Affiliation

Florida International Univ.

Presider Name

Geoffrey B. Elliott

Presider Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 1

The End of Game of Thrones: Contra-Lewis and Tolkien, Knighthood, Kingship, and the Realm

Presenter 1 Name

Elizabeth A. Terry-Roisin

Paper Title 2

George R. R. Martin's Muscular Medievalism: Masculinity, Violence, and Fantasy

Presenter 2 Name

Steven Bruso

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Endicott College

Paper Title 3

Waking the Dragon: Daenerys's Mad Turn and the Politics of Colonialism in Game of Thrones

Presenter 3 Name

Thomas Blake

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Austin College

Start Date

10-5-2020 10:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 158

Description

On May 19, 2019, the final episode of Game of Thrones aired on HBO. This panel will work through the show’s violent ending, when Daenerys torched King’s Landing, and Brandon Stark was made the caretaker king of the seven kingdoms. The panel will address the novels’ themes of slavery, race, colonialism, whiteness, masculinity, sexual violence, feminism, genocide, and power. It will debate the medieval and early modern contexts in Europe, England, and the Mediterranean and Atlantic worlds that Martin drew from (as well as how well he knew them), and examine the expectations that his readers and viewers have, due to the earlier works of Lewis and Tolkien and other Christianity-infused fantasy literature, and popular understandings of the medieval past. Elizabeth Terry-Roisin

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May 10th, 10:30 AM

The End of Game of Thrones in History and Literature

Bernhard 158

On May 19, 2019, the final episode of Game of Thrones aired on HBO. This panel will work through the show’s violent ending, when Daenerys torched King’s Landing, and Brandon Stark was made the caretaker king of the seven kingdoms. The panel will address the novels’ themes of slavery, race, colonialism, whiteness, masculinity, sexual violence, feminism, genocide, and power. It will debate the medieval and early modern contexts in Europe, England, and the Mediterranean and Atlantic worlds that Martin drew from (as well as how well he knew them), and examine the expectations that his readers and viewers have, due to the earlier works of Lewis and Tolkien and other Christianity-infused fantasy literature, and popular understandings of the medieval past. Elizabeth Terry-Roisin