Session Title

Apocalyptic Trajectories in Early Byzantium

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture

Organizer Name

András Kraft

Organizer Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Presider Name

András Kraft

Paper Title 1

The Roman Empire and the Fourth Beast: The Four Kingdoms of Daniel in Late Antiquity and Byzantium

Presenter 1 Name

Christopher J. Bonura

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley

Paper Title 2

Early Byzantine Apocalypticism and the Rise of Islam

Presenter 2 Name

Stephen J. Shoemaker

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Oregon

Paper Title 3

Preaching the Apocalypse: Homiletic Responses to the Crises of the Seventh Century

Presenter 3 Name

Ryan W. Strickler

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Queensland

Paper Title 4

The Literary Topos of the Last Roman Emperor Revisited

Presenter 4 Name

Pablo Ubierna

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires

Start Date

8-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1130

Description

Byzantine apocalyptic literature shaped the apocalyptic imagination of the Middle Ages. Narrative sequences and entire texts that originated in Byzantium came to fundamentally condition the medieval outlook of the eschatological future. This session is dedicated to an interdisciplinary discussion of Greek apocalyptic traditions, with an emphasis on historiography, hermeneutical approaches, and textual analysis. The explicit aim of this panel is to integrate references to the Latin West and the Muslim East in order to reconstruct the global dimension of the Byzantine apocalyptic tradition. Brandie Ratliff

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May 8th, 1:30 PM

Apocalyptic Trajectories in Early Byzantium

Schneider 1130

Byzantine apocalyptic literature shaped the apocalyptic imagination of the Middle Ages. Narrative sequences and entire texts that originated in Byzantium came to fundamentally condition the medieval outlook of the eschatological future. This session is dedicated to an interdisciplinary discussion of Greek apocalyptic traditions, with an emphasis on historiography, hermeneutical approaches, and textual analysis. The explicit aim of this panel is to integrate references to the Latin West and the Muslim East in order to reconstruct the global dimension of the Byzantine apocalyptic tradition. Brandie Ratliff