Session Title

In Memory of Susan Groag Bell: Christine's Legacy in Material Objects

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Christine de Pizan Society, North American Branch

Organizer Name

Benjamin M. Semple

Organizer Affiliation

Gonzaga Univ.

Presider Name

Benjamin M. Semple

Paper Title 1

Unravelling the Mysteries of High-Warp Tapestries in the Works of Christine de Pizan

Presenter 1 Name

Julia A. Nephew; Earl Jeffrey Richards

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Independent Scholar; Bergische Univ. Wuppertal

Paper Title 2

Christine de Pizan, from Page to Performance: The Elevated Role of Material Objects in Communicating Thought and Establishing Authority

Presenter 2 Name

Suzanne Savoy

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 3

Cities and the City of Ladies: Christine de Pizan, Urbanism, and the Art of Building

Presenter 3 Name

Shou Jie Eng

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Start Date

9-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 213

Description

The independent scholar Susan Groag Bell, who passed away in 2015, was a forerunner of many of today’s medievalists who focus on the study of women’s writings and lives. Of specific interest to Christine de Pizan scholars was her final book, The Lost Tapestries of the City of Ladies: Christine de Pizan’s Renaissance Legacy, which explored the late medieval and Renaissance reception of Christine through tapestries owned by influential women (such as Elisabeth I, Queen of England, and Anne of Brittany, Queen of France). Inspired by Groag Bell’s scholarship, this session is dedicated to the exploration of material objects – manuscripts, incunabula, tapestries, and so on – in which Christine de Pizan’s legacy persisted through the late medieval and into the early modern period. Benjamin M. Semple

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

In Memory of Susan Groag Bell: Christine's Legacy in Material Objects

Bernhard 213

The independent scholar Susan Groag Bell, who passed away in 2015, was a forerunner of many of today’s medievalists who focus on the study of women’s writings and lives. Of specific interest to Christine de Pizan scholars was her final book, The Lost Tapestries of the City of Ladies: Christine de Pizan’s Renaissance Legacy, which explored the late medieval and Renaissance reception of Christine through tapestries owned by influential women (such as Elisabeth I, Queen of England, and Anne of Brittany, Queen of France). Inspired by Groag Bell’s scholarship, this session is dedicated to the exploration of material objects – manuscripts, incunabula, tapestries, and so on – in which Christine de Pizan’s legacy persisted through the late medieval and into the early modern period. Benjamin M. Semple