Title of paper

Large-Scale Land Acquisition: A Threat to Human Insecurity-Led Land/Ethnic Conflict or a Solution for Economic Development? The Case of Gambella, Ethiopia

Presenter's country

Ethiopia

Start Date

28-5-2016 10:55 AM

End Date

28-5-2016 12:00 PM

Location

Hall I

Submission type

Paper

Abstract

In development and international relations literatures, human security has been explained in a variety of such terms as a policy framework, a political agenda or sometimes as a world view. Though defining the concept of human security remains contested, advocates agreed on shifting a state-centered hegemonic dimension towards people-centered approach. This approach deconstructed the mere focus on guaranteeing national security through military power, and dealt with promoting human development in socio-political and economic conditions via the protection of indivisible and inviolable human rights. The factors that influence land conflicts are complex. Scholars in the area argue that land gives security for people whose access to resources is restricted. The availability and access to resources mainly land helps people enrich in their economic, political and social well-being. On the contrary, competition over land causes conflict. Large-Scale Land Acquisition (LSLA) otherwise called ‘land-grabbing’ is likely to cause the displacement of indigenous poor people, the loss of livelihood and the destruction of environment which are threats for human security. There is no consensus on the concept of the term ‘land-grabbing’. Land grabbing became a sensitive issue particularly after the 2007/8 global food price increase. According to Peluso and Lund (2011), land grabbing is one manifestation of the current worldwide rush to control not only the land but also the life changing resources on and beneath it. To achieve its policy objectives, the Ethiopian government made a lavish land lease prices. The attempt to expand the cultivable area in the country through leasing, however, is causing damages on local community’s livelihoods and environment. In my paper, I will discuss the LSLA-displacement-human insecurity-conflict-development nexus in Gambella, Ethiopia. My paper also discusses when and under what conditions large-scale land acquisitions bring about economic development or cause conflict as well as their implication for the local poor people’s livelihood and their environment in Gambella region.

Keywords

Large-scale land acquisitions, displacement, human (in) security, land conflict, livelihood, environment, development

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May 28th, 10:55 AM May 28th, 12:00 PM

Large-Scale Land Acquisition: A Threat to Human Insecurity-Led Land/Ethnic Conflict or a Solution for Economic Development? The Case of Gambella, Ethiopia

Hall I

In development and international relations literatures, human security has been explained in a variety of such terms as a policy framework, a political agenda or sometimes as a world view. Though defining the concept of human security remains contested, advocates agreed on shifting a state-centered hegemonic dimension towards people-centered approach. This approach deconstructed the mere focus on guaranteeing national security through military power, and dealt with promoting human development in socio-political and economic conditions via the protection of indivisible and inviolable human rights. The factors that influence land conflicts are complex. Scholars in the area argue that land gives security for people whose access to resources is restricted. The availability and access to resources mainly land helps people enrich in their economic, political and social well-being. On the contrary, competition over land causes conflict. Large-Scale Land Acquisition (LSLA) otherwise called ‘land-grabbing’ is likely to cause the displacement of indigenous poor people, the loss of livelihood and the destruction of environment which are threats for human security. There is no consensus on the concept of the term ‘land-grabbing’. Land grabbing became a sensitive issue particularly after the 2007/8 global food price increase. According to Peluso and Lund (2011), land grabbing is one manifestation of the current worldwide rush to control not only the land but also the life changing resources on and beneath it. To achieve its policy objectives, the Ethiopian government made a lavish land lease prices. The attempt to expand the cultivable area in the country through leasing, however, is causing damages on local community’s livelihoods and environment. In my paper, I will discuss the LSLA-displacement-human insecurity-conflict-development nexus in Gambella, Ethiopia. My paper also discusses when and under what conditions large-scale land acquisitions bring about economic development or cause conflict as well as their implication for the local poor people’s livelihood and their environment in Gambella region.