Date of Award

12-1990

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Educational Leadership, Research and Technology

First Advisor

Dr. Edgar A. Kelley

Second Advisor

Dr. Robert Brashear

Third Advisor

Dr. Charles Warfield

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify the self-reported leadership style of higher education administrators in Venezuela as related to six selected demographic variables: age, sex, highest academic degree earned, years of experience in either colleges or technological institutes, marital status, and union experiences. The subjects of the study were 58 directive council members of three colleges and five technological institutes in Venezuela. Eighty-three percent of all potential subjects participated in the study. Two instruments--the LBA-II-Self (Spanish version produced by Blanchard Training and Development, Inc.) and a demographic data form--were used to gather data.

The validity and reliability of the Spanish version of the LBA-II-Self was calculated; the alpha reliability coefficient obtained was.55. Parametric and nonparametric tests were used to test the hypotheses of no expected differences. The t test was formulated to test the independent variables of age and years of experience in higher education. The chi square was the statistic model applied to test the null hypotheses for the variables of sex, marital status, highest degree earned, and union experiences.

The six null hypotheses of this study were accepted (p $<$.05). There were no significant differences between self-reported leadership styles of higher education administrators in Venezuela and six demographic variables: age, sex, highest academic degree earned, years of experience, marital status, and union experiences. In general, the findings of this study confirmed findings of previous research studies. Evidently, demographic variables seem not to be predictors of leadership styles; therefore, further studies are not recommended.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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