Date of Award

4-1985

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Beverly Belson

Second Advisor

Dr. Robert Brashear

Third Advisor

Dr. Edward Trembley

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Norman Peterson

Abstract

The literature review outlined the historical perspectives impacting current thinking about the role fathers play in child development. Theories of child development saw the mother as the important parent and all but ignored the father. Later researchers studied the father-daughter relationship and found that the paternal relationship is also an important factor in a female's personality development.

Theories of female alcoholism reviewed in this study indicate that there is a relationship between sex-role conflict and female alcoholism. Existing data show that the family of origin of female alcoholics is characterized by a cold, rejecting mother and a warm, accepting father. Therefore, cross-sexed modeling occurred which caused sex-role conflict and the later use of alcohol to relieve this conflict.

The purpose of this research study was to determine whether or not there are significant mean differences between alcoholic and nonalcoholic women's perceptions of their fathers. Thirty-six women were used in the final data analysis; 18 were alcoholic and 18 were nonalcoholic controls. Participants responded to the Attitude Toward Parents Scale--Form F. Subjects also responded to the Attitude Toward Parents Scale--Form M, in order to test the post hoc hypothesis which dealt with the female alcoholic's maternal relationship. The scores were analyzed for significant mean differences by a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

The null hypothesis was accepted. At a .05 level of confidence there were no significant mean differences between the alcoholic and nonalcoholic women's perception of their relationship with their fathers, as measured by the Attitude Toward Parents Scale--Form F. The post hoc null hypothesis that there would be no significant mean differences between alcoholic and nonalcoholic women's perception of their relationship with their mother, as measured by the Attitude Toward Parents Scale--Form M, was rejected at a .05 level of confidence.

The findings of this research study appear to contradict other current research findings which suggest that alcoholic women tend to idealize and identify with their fathers and experience resultant sex-role conflict which is relieved by the use of alcohol. However, the findings do suggest that the theory may apply to the mother-daughter relationship among alcoholic women.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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