Date of Award

Spring 2017

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Joseph R. Morris

Second Advisor

Dr. Mary Z. Anderson

Third Advisor

Dr. Susan V. Piazza

Abstract

An interesting and often puzzling aspect of violent relationships is its cyclical nature. Despite the high probability of future victimization, many victims of domestic violence often leave and return multiple times. A considerable amount of research reports that although a woman might leave her abusive partner with the intention of not returning, after some time, she returns (Aizer, & Dal Bo, 2009; Anderson, 2003; Choice & Lamke, 1999; Drigotas & Rusbult, 1992; Gordon et al., 2004; Lerner, & Kennedy, 2000; Pape & Arias, 2000; Rhatigan, Street, & Axsom, 2006; Rusbult, & Martz, 1995; Strube, 1988; Strube & Barbour, 1983, 1984; Truman-Schram, et al., 2000; Walker, 1979). The objective of this study was to understand how interpersonal dependency and self-efficacy influenced intention to return. Participants were 70 women who resided in rural and urban shelters for battered women in Southwest Michigan. They were administered a survey packet, which contained four measures: a demographic questionnaire, the Self Efficacy Scale for Battered Women (Varvaro & Palmer, 1993), the Interpersonal Dependency Inventory (Hirschfeld et al., 1977), and the Intention to Return Questionnaire (Gordon et al., 2004). Primary analyses were multiple regression and hierarchical multiple regression. Three hypotheses were tested with mixed results. Hypothesis 1 determined that self-efficacy was a statistically significant predictor of intention to return. Hypothesis 2a found that emotional reliance on another person (subscale of IDI) was a statistically significant predictor of intention to return. Hypothesis 2b suggested that lack of social self-confidence (subscale of IDI) was not a statistically significant predictor of intention to return. Hypothesis 2c indicated that assertion of autonomy (subscale of IDI) was not a statistically significant predictor of intention to return. Hypothesis 3 suggested that self-efficacy did not moderate the relationship between interpersonal dependency and intention to return. Limitations of study are discussed and implications for future research and practice are recommended.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Campus Only

Restricted to Campus until

4-2019

Share

COinS