Date of Award

8-1982

Degree Name

Specialist in Education

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Galen Alessi

Second Advisor

Dr. Howard Farris

Third Advisor

Dr. Paul Mountjoy

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

The present study investigated the effects of written rules and videotape discrimination training on the acquisition, generalization and maintenance of behavior management skills. Three classroom aides and one special education teacher in a classroom for severely mentally impaired students were required to attain 90% mastery on a set of written rules and videotape training episodes. Data on percent correct application of behavior management techniques in the classroom setting were collected prior to and immediately following videotape discrimination training. Results indicated an increase over pretraining levels in all subjects' correct application of behavior management techniques immediately following videotape discrimination training. A further increase occurred once feedback on classroom performance was introduced. Maintenance data collected six weeks after training showed a decrease in percent correct application of behavior management techniques. Although videotape discrimination training proved an effective method for quickly teaching behavior management techniques, further research is needed to determine how to maintain these skills in the natural setting.

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