Session Title

Speaking Ovid: Vernacular Ovidianisms

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Studies at Penn

Organizer Name

Elizaveta Strakhov

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Presider Name

A. B. Kraebel

Presider Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 1

Boundaries and Their Dissolution: Love and Language in Fourteenth-Century Ovidian Poetry

Presenter 1 Name

John M. Fyler

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Tufts Univ.

Paper Title 2

O Supernasor: Jean De Le Mote and the Politics of Ovidianism

Presenter 2 Name

Elizaveta Strakhov

Paper Title 3

The French Ovid: From the Romance of the Rose to René d'Anjou

Presenter 3 Name

Kevin Brownlee

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Start Date

12-5-2013 8:30 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1360

Description

This panel seeks to theorize why Ovidian allusions occur with such frequency in so many different medieval literary productions. Specifically, this panel considers the ways in which Ovidianism creates a cross-regional and transnational literary discourse that is at once acutely aware of pre-existing geographic and linguistic borders, as well as of various (and variously shifting) political divisions. How does this kind of cross-regional Ovidianism function as a shared poetic language? In what ways does it travel and what does it gain or lose as it crosses geographical borders? What aspects of it remain constant and what aspects are shed more quickly? How does the notion of a shared poetic language impact our understanding of translation, trope, and genre? Indeed, may we talk about “speaking Ovid”?

Elizaveta Strakhov

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May 12th, 8:30 AM

Speaking Ovid: Vernacular Ovidianisms

Schneider 1360

This panel seeks to theorize why Ovidian allusions occur with such frequency in so many different medieval literary productions. Specifically, this panel considers the ways in which Ovidianism creates a cross-regional and transnational literary discourse that is at once acutely aware of pre-existing geographic and linguistic borders, as well as of various (and variously shifting) political divisions. How does this kind of cross-regional Ovidianism function as a shared poetic language? In what ways does it travel and what does it gain or lose as it crosses geographical borders? What aspects of it remain constant and what aspects are shed more quickly? How does the notion of a shared poetic language impact our understanding of translation, trope, and genre? Indeed, may we talk about “speaking Ovid”?

Elizaveta Strakhov