Session Title

The Cultures of Armenia and Georgia

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Rare Book Dept., The Free Library of Philadelphia

Organizer Name

Bert Beynen

Organizer Affiliation

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Temple Univ.

Presider Name

Bert Beynen

Paper Title 1

Religions in Competition: Christianity and Islam in Twelfth-Century Armenian Neomartyrologies

Presenter 1 Name

Sergio La Porta

Presenter 1 Affiliation

California State Univ.-Fresno

Paper Title 2

The Translation Corpus of the Pre-Athonite Period

Presenter 2 Name

Nino Doborjginidze, Irina Lobzhanidze

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Ilia State Univ., Ilia State Univ.

Start Date

13-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2030

Description

Professor La Porta discusses a group of Armenian neomartyrologies and argues that these texts do not provide evidence for a policy of religious persecution, but indicate a climate of religious competition. Professor Asatiani traces how Medieval Georgian changed from 13 to 11 screeves and offers some cognitive interpretation based on the changes in linguistic ‘world view.’ Professors Doborjginidze and Lobzhanidze give an overview of Georgian manuscripts from before the so-called Athonite period, when a number of manuscripts were written, translated and actively edited from the 5th century onward in Georgian cultural centers, e.g. on Mount Sinai. Ms. Petrosyan reconstructs the Armenian lexicon of the Kitāb al-turjumān [Book of the Translator], a topically classified (i.e. non-alphabetic) Syriac-Arabic glossary written in garshuni, Arabic-language writings using the Syriac alphabet, and an important Christian and philosophical work in both Syriac and Arabic cultural history .

Bert Beynen

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May 13th, 10:00 AM

The Cultures of Armenia and Georgia

Fetzer 2030

Professor La Porta discusses a group of Armenian neomartyrologies and argues that these texts do not provide evidence for a policy of religious persecution, but indicate a climate of religious competition. Professor Asatiani traces how Medieval Georgian changed from 13 to 11 screeves and offers some cognitive interpretation based on the changes in linguistic ‘world view.’ Professors Doborjginidze and Lobzhanidze give an overview of Georgian manuscripts from before the so-called Athonite period, when a number of manuscripts were written, translated and actively edited from the 5th century onward in Georgian cultural centers, e.g. on Mount Sinai. Ms. Petrosyan reconstructs the Armenian lexicon of the Kitāb al-turjumān [Book of the Translator], a topically classified (i.e. non-alphabetic) Syriac-Arabic glossary written in garshuni, Arabic-language writings using the Syriac alphabet, and an important Christian and philosophical work in both Syriac and Arabic cultural history .

Bert Beynen