Session Title

The Multi-lingual Fifteenth Century: Alain Chartier, Christine de Pizan, Charles d’Orléans, et autres . . . (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Alain Chartier Society; International Christine de Pizan Society, North American Branch

Organizer Name

Daisy Delogu

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Presider Name

Daisy Delogu

Paper Title 1

Charles d'Orléans's Peculiar English

Presenter 1 Name

Mary-Jo Arn

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 2

Learning French in Medieval England: French Teaching Manuals of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries

Presenter 2 Name

Anthony Nicolas Radoiu

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

Paper Title 3

Authority and Anonymity of French Texts in England

Presenter 3 Name

Hope W. Johnston

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Baylor Univ.

Paper Title 4

Translation, Reception, and Authority: The Case of Alain Chartier's De vita curiali

Presenter 4 Name

Anne-Hélène Miller

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville

Paper Title 5

The French and Latin Works of Alain Chartier: The Popular Voice of Authority

Presenter 5 Name

Emma Cayley

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Exeter

Paper Title 6

Chartier and Dante

Presenter 6 Name

Joan E. McRae

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Middle Tennessee State Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 208

Description

Engaging in the adaptation of Latin sources, (auto)translation, and multi-lingual literary production, the poets and writers, editors and compilers, of the fifteenth century moved in a dynamic, pluri-lingual literary world in which texts and authors alike contested, crossed, and blurred linguistic boundaries. Some of the most exciting scholarship of recent years has examined the material supports (both codices and printed editions), socio-cultural settings, and reception of such textual production.

This session seeks to put into dialogue scholars working on both sides of the Channel, and to investigate textual communities (constituted and imagined variously) rather than writers considered in isolation. We propose Christine, Chartier, and Charles as some of the most important writers of this era, but welcome papers that deal with the themes of the session as manifested in the works of other authors as well.

Paper proposals may engage with, but are not limited to: the movement of writers and/or texts across time and space; translation practices (Latin to vernacular, or between vernaculars); the circulation of literary motifs, lyric fragments, manuscripts, or printed works; the relationship of literature to (social, poetic, national) identity; reception and reading practices; patronage or early book production.

The session will be organized as a roundtable, thereby allowing for a greater number of perspectives, and permitting a lively discussion with all session participants.

Daisy Delogu

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May 12th, 10:00 AM

The Multi-lingual Fifteenth Century: Alain Chartier, Christine de Pizan, Charles d’Orléans, et autres . . . (A Roundtable)

Bernhard 208

Engaging in the adaptation of Latin sources, (auto)translation, and multi-lingual literary production, the poets and writers, editors and compilers, of the fifteenth century moved in a dynamic, pluri-lingual literary world in which texts and authors alike contested, crossed, and blurred linguistic boundaries. Some of the most exciting scholarship of recent years has examined the material supports (both codices and printed editions), socio-cultural settings, and reception of such textual production.

This session seeks to put into dialogue scholars working on both sides of the Channel, and to investigate textual communities (constituted and imagined variously) rather than writers considered in isolation. We propose Christine, Chartier, and Charles as some of the most important writers of this era, but welcome papers that deal with the themes of the session as manifested in the works of other authors as well.

Paper proposals may engage with, but are not limited to: the movement of writers and/or texts across time and space; translation practices (Latin to vernacular, or between vernaculars); the circulation of literary motifs, lyric fragments, manuscripts, or printed works; the relationship of literature to (social, poetic, national) identity; reception and reading practices; patronage or early book production.

The session will be organized as a roundtable, thereby allowing for a greater number of perspectives, and permitting a lively discussion with all session participants.

Daisy Delogu