Session Title

The Playful Reader

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Game Cultures Society

Organizer Name

Serina Patterson

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of British Columbia

Presider Name

Serina Patterson

Paper Title 1

Playful Reading as Pastime at the French Court: The Performance of Literary Games and Poetic Competitions in the Late Middle Ages

Presenter 1 Name

Vanina M. Kopp

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Deutsches Historisches Institut Paris

Paper Title 2

Querelle over and in the Findern MS (CUL Ff.1.6): An Analysis of Women's Names and Female Voices

Presenter 2 Name

Cynthia A. Rogers

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Paper Title 3

Like the Castle in Its Corner: Game as Genre in Medieval Literature

Presenter 3 Name

Betsy McCormick

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Mount San Antonio College

Start Date

12-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

In medieval texts, the paradigm of reading as a game is already both implicit and explicit: the rhetorical assumptions of the text presume an author’s play of intertexuality as well as a readership expecting to be tested via the play between memory and intertexuality. In fact, critics ranging from Walter Ong to Wolfgang Iser use, or assume, a game analogy to describe the process of reading a literary text. Participation is mutual for this 'game' to work since a text’s meaning is defined by the reader’s interactive participation in this play space. Consequently, medieval reading is an interplay between the inherited tradition and the present for both the author and the reader. So how do we consider the ways in which the medieval reader recognizes an author’s choices of, and between, conventions and tradition? The individual reader must be somehow be alerted to the nature of the game and taught to interpret the narrative code he, or she, is reading. What are the processes by which such 'play' is signaled?

Serina Patterson

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May 12th, 10:00 AM

The Playful Reader

Bernhard 210

In medieval texts, the paradigm of reading as a game is already both implicit and explicit: the rhetorical assumptions of the text presume an author’s play of intertexuality as well as a readership expecting to be tested via the play between memory and intertexuality. In fact, critics ranging from Walter Ong to Wolfgang Iser use, or assume, a game analogy to describe the process of reading a literary text. Participation is mutual for this 'game' to work since a text’s meaning is defined by the reader’s interactive participation in this play space. Consequently, medieval reading is an interplay between the inherited tradition and the present for both the author and the reader. So how do we consider the ways in which the medieval reader recognizes an author’s choices of, and between, conventions and tradition? The individual reader must be somehow be alerted to the nature of the game and taught to interpret the narrative code he, or she, is reading. What are the processes by which such 'play' is signaled?

Serina Patterson