Session Title

The Medieval Balkans as Mirror: Byzantine Perceptions of the Balkans and the World Beyond

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Univ. of Florida; Research Group on Manuscript Evidence

Organizer Name

Mildred Budny, Florin Curta

Organizer Affiliation

Research Group on Manuscript Evidence, Univ. of Florida

Presider Name

Mildred Budny

Paper Title 1

"Wild Sprout Grafted into the Excellent Olive Tree of the New Israel": Byzantine Views of the Bulgarians after Their Conversion

Presenter 1 Name

Kirił Marinow

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Łódź

Paper Title 2

"More Savages than Nature Itself": The Image of the Nomads in the Byzantine Historiography of the Tenth-Twelfth Centuries and the Political Practice of the Constantinopolitan Court

Presenter 2 Name

Aleksander Paroń

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology, Wrocław

Paper Title 3

The Image of Peter I in Bulgarian Historiography: Interpretations by Petăr Mutafčiev

Presenter 3 Name

Jan Mikołaj Wolski

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Łódź

Paper Title 4

Byzantine Perceptions of the Bulgarian Economy as a Distorted Mirror

Presenter 4 Name

Elisaveta Todorova

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Cincinnati

Start Date

12-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 2345

Description

Recent Byzantine Studies have placed much emphasis on the “image of the Other,” especially on the use of the Empire’s neighbors in the Balkans or the Caucaus region, as a foil for the construction of the Self in works by the educated elites in Constantinople. Given the long conflict between Bulgaria and Byzantium between the late 8th and the early 11th centuries, the landscape in the central and eastern Balkans, as well as all manner of things Bulgarian (from dress to military skills), played a significant role in the works of Byzantine historians preoccupied with the definition of an imperial, Byzantine identity. A similar tension pertained in the 12th century, as Byzantine intellectuals (especially Anna Comnena) began to reflect upon the relation between the Empire and the world beyond the Balkans, namely the nomads in the steppe lands north of the Black Sea (Pechenegs, Oghuz, Cumans). This session aims to showcase contributions to the study of the fascinating “mirror image” of Byzantine intellectuals gazing across the Balkans.

Mildred Budny

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May 12th, 1:30 PM

The Medieval Balkans as Mirror: Byzantine Perceptions of the Balkans and the World Beyond

Schneider 2345

Recent Byzantine Studies have placed much emphasis on the “image of the Other,” especially on the use of the Empire’s neighbors in the Balkans or the Caucaus region, as a foil for the construction of the Self in works by the educated elites in Constantinople. Given the long conflict between Bulgaria and Byzantium between the late 8th and the early 11th centuries, the landscape in the central and eastern Balkans, as well as all manner of things Bulgarian (from dress to military skills), played a significant role in the works of Byzantine historians preoccupied with the definition of an imperial, Byzantine identity. A similar tension pertained in the 12th century, as Byzantine intellectuals (especially Anna Comnena) began to reflect upon the relation between the Empire and the world beyond the Balkans, namely the nomads in the steppe lands north of the Black Sea (Pechenegs, Oghuz, Cumans). This session aims to showcase contributions to the study of the fascinating “mirror image” of Byzantine intellectuals gazing across the Balkans.

Mildred Budny