Title of paper

6.2 Factors Influencing Sustainable Employee and Business Development in Africa: The Case of Chinese Organizations

Presenter's country

United Kingdom

Start Date

17-8-2018 4:30 PM

End Date

17-8-2018 5:30 PM

Location

Bernhard Center 105-107

Submission type

Abstract

Abstract

This paper explains the factors that influence African sustainable development in the context of business by using a stakeholder view. The paper analyzes the practices of 86 Chinese organizations investing in Kenya, Zambia, and South Africa. These organizations involve different types of ownership and sizes across various sectors. From these organizations, 156 interviews were conducted with a similar proportion of Chinese investors/business owners and local employees from each of the countries. The findings show that (1) Chinese managers perceive that local workers are able to improve their stakeholder roles in the workplace by improving their education level, skills for work, and capabilities both prior to work and in the workplace; (2) Chinese managers’ ability to adapt to and learn from the local business environment will help improve the stakeholder status in the local workforce; and (3) local perceptions of Chinese organizational practices influence the development of both Chinese firms and the local workforce. These findings help identify the need for local sustainable development in businesses and the influence of foreign organizations on such development from a local employee stakeholder perspective.

Keywords

sustainable development, local employee, stakeholder perspective, Africa, China

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Aug 17th, 4:30 PM Aug 17th, 5:30 PM

6.2 Factors Influencing Sustainable Employee and Business Development in Africa: The Case of Chinese Organizations

Bernhard Center 105-107

This paper explains the factors that influence African sustainable development in the context of business by using a stakeholder view. The paper analyzes the practices of 86 Chinese organizations investing in Kenya, Zambia, and South Africa. These organizations involve different types of ownership and sizes across various sectors. From these organizations, 156 interviews were conducted with a similar proportion of Chinese investors/business owners and local employees from each of the countries. The findings show that (1) Chinese managers perceive that local workers are able to improve their stakeholder roles in the workplace by improving their education level, skills for work, and capabilities both prior to work and in the workplace; (2) Chinese managers’ ability to adapt to and learn from the local business environment will help improve the stakeholder status in the local workforce; and (3) local perceptions of Chinese organizational practices influence the development of both Chinese firms and the local workforce. These findings help identify the need for local sustainable development in businesses and the influence of foreign organizations on such development from a local employee stakeholder perspective.