Title of paper

10.1 Evangelical Christians in Ethiopia: Examining the Terrains of Political Engagements

Presenter's country

United States

Start Date

18-8-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

18-8-2018 3:00 PM

Location

1920 Sangren Hall

Submission type

Presentation

Abstract

The history of the evangelical movement in Ethiopia is, relatively speaking, a recent one. Over the last five decades, the number of Ethiopians who consider themselves as evangelicals, or to employ a more popular term, the Pentes has grown considerably. They now constitute close to 20% of the population, introducing a big demographic shift. The socio-political engagement of the evangelical Christians in the nation has been very limited in the past. Cultural, legal and political factors may account for their lack of involvement. But currently, they are causing significant debuts in a number of ways. The most visible expression of this development is the meteoric rise of the new prime minister Abiy Ahmed. The new political dynamics in Ethiopia calls for a fresh thinking of the wider role of faith-based institutions in Ethiopia. This subject, in spite of its importance, has not been sufficiently explored, and this paper is an attempt to fill the gap, partially if not wholly.

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Aug 18th, 2:00 PM Aug 18th, 3:00 PM

10.1 Evangelical Christians in Ethiopia: Examining the Terrains of Political Engagements

1920 Sangren Hall

The history of the evangelical movement in Ethiopia is, relatively speaking, a recent one. Over the last five decades, the number of Ethiopians who consider themselves as evangelicals, or to employ a more popular term, the Pentes has grown considerably. They now constitute close to 20% of the population, introducing a big demographic shift. The socio-political engagement of the evangelical Christians in the nation has been very limited in the past. Cultural, legal and political factors may account for their lack of involvement. But currently, they are causing significant debuts in a number of ways. The most visible expression of this development is the meteoric rise of the new prime minister Abiy Ahmed. The new political dynamics in Ethiopia calls for a fresh thinking of the wider role of faith-based institutions in Ethiopia. This subject, in spite of its importance, has not been sufficiently explored, and this paper is an attempt to fill the gap, partially if not wholly.