Author

Sefchick

Date of Award

12-1987

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Chris Koronakos

Second Advisor

Dr. Bradley Huitema

Third Advisor

Dr. Malcom Robertson

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

This study tested the following hypotheses: (a) Cognitive-Behavior Therapy would be more effective than either Relaxation Therapy in reducing speech A-state anxiety or Cognitive Restructuring in reducing speech A-trait anxiety; (b) Relaxation Therapy would be more effective than Cognitive Restructuring in reducing speech A-state anxiety; and (c) Cognitive Restructuring would be more effective than Relaxation Therapy in reducing speech A-trait anxiety.

Fifteen volunteers from a speakers organization were screened and randomly assigned to one of three treatments. The Speech Anxiety Inventory was administered before and after treatments to assess subjects' levels of speech A-state and A-trait anxiety.

Results indicated that Cognitive-Behavior Therapy was significantly more effective than Cognitive Restructuring on speech A-trait anxiety measures, and that Relaxation Therapy was significantly more effective than Cognitive Restructuring on speech A-state anxiety measures.

Evidence suggested that all three treatments are effective interventions in the reduction of speech A-state and A-trait anxiety.

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