Author

Sharenow

Date of Award

12-1985

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. R. Wayne Fuqua

Second Advisor

Dr. Galen Alessi

Third Advisor

Dr. Alan Poling

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

Miltenberger, Fuqua, and McKinley (1985) reported that the competing response component of the habit reversal treatment package (Azrin & Nunn, 1973) when presented alone was as effective as the entire habit reversal procedure in suppressing muscle tics. In a related study, Miltenberger and Fuqua (1 9 8 5 , in press) reported that the performance of the competing response contingent on the occurrence of a variety of nervous habits resulted in greater response suppression than the non-contingent performance of the competing response. In an effort to determine whether the topography of the competing response was important to the reported effects, this study compared the suppression of muscle tics by a competing response that was topographically similar to the muscle tic with the effects of a competing response that was topographically dissimilar to the muscle tic. Four subjects engaged in competing responses (either similar or dissimilar) contingent on the occurrence of a muscle tic. The results showed a decrease in muscle tic frequency with the introduction of either treatment, suggesting that the topography of the competing response may not be crucial for response suppression.

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Psychology Commons

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