Author

Meyer

Date of Award

4-1982

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Cheryl Poche

Second Advisor

Dr. Joetta Long

Third Advisor

Dr. Jack Michael

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the effects of parental self-recording from audiotapes of family interactions on effective parenting skills and on the generality of their application to three different times of the day in which different child behaviors occurred.

Two single parents were instructed to deliver correct commands and differential reinforcement and to code and graph their verbalizations from audiotapes. Self-recording was introduced in one situation at a time, while audiotaped assessments were made by the parent in all three situations throughout the day. Both positive and cost incentive systems were used for the delivery of tapes and codings but not for behavioral change.

Parent and child behaviors changed in desirable directions after the procedure was introduced. Generality effects were clear in all response categories except descriptive praise. As the number of codings increased, greater parent behavior changes were seen on the targeted and non-targeted situations.

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Psychology Commons

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