Author

Horton

Date of Award

12-1995

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Medieval Studies

First Advisor

Dr. Larry J. Simon

Second Advisor

Dr. Rand Johnson

Third Advisor

Dr. Otto Grundler

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

The Carolingian emperors were relatively tolerant towards the Jewish communities within their realm. They exempted the Jews from many feudal obligations and gave them charters that protected the role of the Jews as merchants within the empire. These charters also protected the Jewish community from undue persecutions of the Church. The privileges guaranteed within these charters drew criticism from many of the leading churchmen at the time.

The anti-Jewish campaign of Agobard, Bishop of Lyons from 814 to 840, has received a fair amount of scholarly attention, whereas the ensuing campaigns of Amulo, Bishop of Lyons from 841 to 852, and the bishops assembled at the Council of Paris-Meaux from 845 to 846 have not. This study places the anti-Jewish campaign of Agobard and the subsequent campaigns of Amulo and the Paris-Meaux councils in their historical context and analyzes their theological and political consequences for Carolingian society.

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