Author

Olson

Date of Award

8-1999

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. John Austin

Second Advisor

Dr. Alyce Dickinson

Third Advisor

Dr. Wayne Fuqua

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

Experimental evaluations of Behavior-based Safety (BBS) processes applied with lone workers are scarce. Further research is needed to determine the power of self-monitoring based interventions for improving safe behavior, and to explore the best practices for improving safety when employees work alone. In the current study,· four male bus operators (ages 40-50) self-monitored their safe performance and initialed feedback graphs based on their self-monitoring data at the end of each day. Experimental data collectors observed each participant by riding buses as passengers. A multiple baseline design across performances was used to assess the effects of the intervention on four target performances. The intervention resulted in a 12.5% overall increase in safe performance for the group, with individual increases in safe performance that ranged from 3% to 41 % for specific target performances. The results are discussed in terms of the value of BBS processes for employees who work alone and the research needed to determine the components of self-monitoring processes that are most critical for generating improvements in safe performance.

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