Author

Trombley

Date of Award

4-2004

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Communication

First Advisor

Jennifer Billy

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

This study used the Technology Acceptance Model, prior research of self-efficacy, and transfer of training theory, to examine the relationships between employee computer self-efficacy, perceptions of the ease of use of CBT, perceptions of the usefulness of CBT, behavioral intention, and transfer of training, following computer-based training. Eighty-three employees of a large mid-west retail chain participated in this study. A pre-test, measuring existing computer self-efficacy, employee perceptions of the ease of use of general computer-based training, and prior safety knowledge was given to employees prior to the start of a web-based safety training program. A post-test, measuring developed computer self-efficacy, employee perceptions of the ease of use of general CBT, employee perceptions of the usefulness of CBT, and safety knowledge immediately followed the training. Additionally, a follow-up post-test, measuring computer self-efficacy, safety knowledge, and behavior was given to employees one week after the training. As predicted, the data suggested a positive relationship between employee self-efficacy scores and their perceptions of CBT ease of use. Furthermore, self-efficacy scores and behavioral intentions to use the training material were positively associated. However inconsistent with predictions, the data revealed a negative relationship between computer self-efficacy scores and knowledge change.

Included in

Communication Commons

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