Author

Sebold

Date of Award

8-2004

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Human Performance and Health Education

Department

Health, Physical Education & Recreation

First Advisor

Dr. Michael G. Miller

Second Advisor

Dr. Timothy Michael

Third Advisor

Dr. YuanLong Liu

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Robert Baker

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

Limited research on emu oil has shown evidence of anti-inflammatory activity. Currently, emu oil has been used anecdotally to reduce soreness after physical activity. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of emu oil on delayed onset muscle soreness in the quadriceps. The objectives were to examine whether emu oil decreased soreness perceptually and physiologically after eccentric exercises on a leg extension machine.

The research design was a double blind format. Subjects were randomly assigned to three groups. Those three groups were randomly assigned to a given treatment order (control, placebo, or treatment). This was a counter-balanced study, allowing for subjects to serve as their own control. A repeated measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA) was performed to analyze the data.

Results showed no significant effect on creatine kinase levels but did decrease muscle soreness. Significance was found perceptually through the visual analog scale at 36-hours post-exercise in the emu oil condition.

In conclusion, there was a subjective decrease in soreness with regard to the emu oil treatment but that may not have been related to decreased muscle damage.

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