Author

Crouse

Date of Award

8-1996

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences

Department

Speech Pathology and Audiology

First Advisor

Dr. Nickola W. Nelson

Second Advisor

Dr. Candis Warner

Third Advisor

Dr. Troy Mariage

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

This study was designed to analyze the differences in the self-talk of students with language impairments when compared with students with normal language. Nine fifth grade students with language impairments and nine fifth grade students with normal language, identified by their teachers as average-achieving, participated in this study. Participants were instructed to use a think-aloud technique while completing sets of computational and math story problems. Resulting samples of self-talk were transcribed and coded.

Results indicated several significant differences in the self-talk of students with language impairments when compared with their normal language peers. In regard to quantitative aspects of self-talk, students with language impairments used fewer total words, different words, personal pronouns, and completed fewer problems than their normal language peers. In regard to problem solving choices, students with language impairments were off track more often and on track less often than their normal language peers. In regard to self-regulatory talk, students with language impairments made fewer evaluating and confirming statements than their normal language peers.

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