Author

Mason

Date of Award

6-1991

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. William K. Redmon

Second Advisor

Dr. Jack Michael

Third Advisor

Dr. Alan Poling

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

A computer simulation was developed to examine the effects of immediate versus delayed visual feedback on the accuracy of identifying specified aberrations in sample stimuli. In a self-paced computer tutorial, subjects learned to identify particular aberrations in a schematic diagram of a hard disk drive. During experimental sessions, subjects were exposed to a series of 200 samples presented four at a time sequentially on a computer screen, and were required to indicate with a computer mouse whether or not each sample drive contained an aberration. Accuracy of error detection was assessed under four experimental conditions: (1) self-paced, immediate feedback; (2) self-paced, delayed feedback; (3) machine-paced, immediate feedback; and (4) machine-paced, delayed feedback. The order of error detection accuracy, from greatest to least, occurred under the (a) self-paced, immediate feedback condition; (b) self-paced, delayed feedback; (c) machine-paced, immediate feedback; and (d) machine-paced, delayed feedback conditions.

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