Session Title

What Is Medieval History? I: Digital History, Archaeological Science, and Alternative Approaches to Historical Argumentation (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval History Workshop, Harvard Univ.

Organizer Name

Claire Adams

Organizer Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Presider Name

Henry Gruber

Presider Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Paper Title 1

Digital Material: Photogrammetry, 3D Modeling, and Medieval Objects

Presenter 1 Name

Carolyn Twomey

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Boston College

Paper Title 2

Alternative Approaches to Viking-Age Slavery: Archaeological Proxies

Presenter 2 Name

Matthew Delvaux

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Boston College

Paper Title 3

Graffiti on Coins: New Approaches to Old Subjects

Presenter 3 Name

Julia Judge

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Paper Title 4

"The First Wealth Is Health": The DALME Apothecary Inventories in Context

Presenter 4 Name

Claire Adams

Start Date

13-5-2018 8:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2030

Description

The lines dividing the humanities and the sciences are becoming ever more blurred and the field of medieval history is no exception. This panel is designed to keep scholars of medieval history abreast of these changes by fostering dialogue among historians interested in integrating the natural and digital sciences into their scholarship. Participants will make “lightning” presentations 8 minutes in length on how topics such as digital humanities, isotopic analysis, osteology, and the computer sciences can enrich our understanding of medieval history. After these lightning presentations, presenters will participate for the remainder of the session in a round-table discussion on how such sub-disciplines can inform the study of medieval history. Scholars are encouraged to consider how modern disciplinary boundaries inform their research projects and argumentation.

Claire Adams

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May 13th, 8:30 AM

What Is Medieval History? I: Digital History, Archaeological Science, and Alternative Approaches to Historical Argumentation (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 2030

The lines dividing the humanities and the sciences are becoming ever more blurred and the field of medieval history is no exception. This panel is designed to keep scholars of medieval history abreast of these changes by fostering dialogue among historians interested in integrating the natural and digital sciences into their scholarship. Participants will make “lightning” presentations 8 minutes in length on how topics such as digital humanities, isotopic analysis, osteology, and the computer sciences can enrich our understanding of medieval history. After these lightning presentations, presenters will participate for the remainder of the session in a round-table discussion on how such sub-disciplines can inform the study of medieval history. Scholars are encouraged to consider how modern disciplinary boundaries inform their research projects and argumentation.

Claire Adams