Session Title

Digital Editing / Digital Archiving II: (By and Large) Projects and Experiences

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Digital Philology: A Journal of Medieval Cultures

Organizer Name

Albert Lloret

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Massachusetts-Amherst

Presider Name

Jeanette Patterson

Presider Affiliation

Binghamton Univ.

Paper Title 1

Why Bother with Wax: Seals and Digital Editions of Medieval Charters

Presenter 1 Name

John McEwan

Presenter 1 Affiliation

St. Louis Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Oxford-BYU Syriac Corpus: A Digital Library for Syriac Texts

Presenter 2 Name

James E. Walters

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Rochester College

Paper Title 3

The Arabic New Testament in Medieval Iberia: Creating Digital Parallel, Bilingual Editions at an Undergraduate Liberal Arts Institution

Presenter 3 Name

Jason Busic

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Denison Univ.

Paper Title 4

Liberum Spatium: Reconstructing Medieval Space

Presenter 4 Name

Alodia Martín-Martínez

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Temple Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2018 3:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1730

Description

The prevalent use of digital tools and online environments to edit medieval texts is resulting in a myriad of projects in which unique solutions are deployed to offer optimal representations of very different textual objects. Single manuscripts, library collections, authorial corpora, and works preserved in several witnesses, for instance, all beg for different editorial and archival approaches. The possibilities for study and representation, in addition, are multiplied not only by the technologies employed or designed ad hoc for each project, but also by the scholars’ ideas on the very nature of what is being studied.

Albert Lloret

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

Digital Editing / Digital Archiving II: (By and Large) Projects and Experiences

Sangren 1730

The prevalent use of digital tools and online environments to edit medieval texts is resulting in a myriad of projects in which unique solutions are deployed to offer optimal representations of very different textual objects. Single manuscripts, library collections, authorial corpora, and works preserved in several witnesses, for instance, all beg for different editorial and archival approaches. The possibilities for study and representation, in addition, are multiplied not only by the technologies employed or designed ad hoc for each project, but also by the scholars’ ideas on the very nature of what is being studied.

Albert Lloret