Session Title

Games and Manuscripts

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Game Cultures Society

Organizer Name

Betsy McCormick

Organizer Affiliation

Mount San Antonio College

Presider Name

Sarah Jane Sprouse

Presider Affiliation

Texas Tech Univ.

Paper Title 1

Shadows over Camelot: Collaborative Narration and Arthurian Games

Presenter 1 Name

Kate Lynne Fedewa

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Michigan State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Prayers for Decius: Gaming and Dice in the Carmina Burana

Presenter 2 Name

Sarah Layman

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 3

The Bob-Line Game in Chaucer's The Tale of Sir Thopas

Presenter 3 Name

McKenzie Peck

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Texas Tech Univ.

Paper Title 4

The "Endless Knot[tes]" of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Presenter 4 Name

Kimberly Bell

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Sam Houston State Univ.

Start Date

13-5-2018 10:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

It is well known that the glosses and marginalia found in medieval manuscripts were commonly left by scribes, readers, and illuminators as ways to respond to the texts they read. Oftentimes, these marginal additions—including images of people, animals, flora, and fauna –were created to react directly to a given text and purposefully designed to be understood as interactive games to be played with the text and the reader. This session proposes to explore the gaming relationships among image, text, and reader to comprehend better how the people of the Middle Ages understood the purpose and function of games in literary texts.

Betsy McCormick

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May 13th, 10:30 AM

Games and Manuscripts

Bernhard 204

It is well known that the glosses and marginalia found in medieval manuscripts were commonly left by scribes, readers, and illuminators as ways to respond to the texts they read. Oftentimes, these marginal additions—including images of people, animals, flora, and fauna –were created to react directly to a given text and purposefully designed to be understood as interactive games to be played with the text and the reader. This session proposes to explore the gaming relationships among image, text, and reader to comprehend better how the people of the Middle Ages understood the purpose and function of games in literary texts.

Betsy McCormick