Session Title

Charles d’Orléans: Forms and Genres

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Boyda Johnstone; B. S. W. Barootes

Organizer Affiliation

Fordham Univ.; Univ. of Toronto

Presider Name

Boyda Johnstone

Paper Title 1

Charles d'Orléans's English Metrical Phonology

Presenter 1 Name

Eric Weiskott

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Boston College

Paper Title 2

Enclosure and Release: Structural Mourning in Fortunes Stabilnes

Presenter 2 Name

B. S. W. Barootes

Paper Title 3

Respondent

Presenter 3 Name

Ardis Butterfield

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2018 10:00 AM

Session Location

Valley 3 Stinson 306

Description

Although he is one of the chief poetic innovators of the mid-fifteenth century in both English and French, Charles d’Orléans is too often a neglected figure: articles on his work remain few and far between; his poems are rarely anthologized; and most students, including many in graduate school, have never heard of him. An inheritor of Machaut, Froissart, and Christine de Pizan on one side of the Channel and of Chaucer, Gower, and Lydgate on the other, Charles spent twenty-five years in Lancastrian captivity cultivating a rich literary voice that incorporates and transforms the traditions of his homeland and those of English hosts. This session asks participants to consider the many genres and forms with which Charles engaged—how he perpetuated, altered, or synthesized them.

Boyda Johnstone

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 11th, 10:00 AM

Charles d’Orléans: Forms and Genres

Valley 3 Stinson 306

Although he is one of the chief poetic innovators of the mid-fifteenth century in both English and French, Charles d’Orléans is too often a neglected figure: articles on his work remain few and far between; his poems are rarely anthologized; and most students, including many in graduate school, have never heard of him. An inheritor of Machaut, Froissart, and Christine de Pizan on one side of the Channel and of Chaucer, Gower, and Lydgate on the other, Charles spent twenty-five years in Lancastrian captivity cultivating a rich literary voice that incorporates and transforms the traditions of his homeland and those of English hosts. This session asks participants to consider the many genres and forms with which Charles engaged—how he perpetuated, altered, or synthesized them.

Boyda Johnstone