Session Title

Performances of Marie de France: Chevrefoil

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Marie de France Society

Organizer Name

Simonetta Cochis

Organizer Affiliation

Transylvania Univ.

Presider Name

Rupert T. Pickens

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Kentucky

Paper Title 1

Performer

Presenter 1 Name

Yvonne LeBlanc

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 2

Performer

Presenter 2 Name

Ronald Cook

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 3

Performer

Presenter 3 Name

Dorothy Gilbert

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley

Paper Title 4

Performer

Presenter 4 Name

Simonetta Cochis

Paper Title 5

Performer

Presenter 5 Name

Walter A. Blue

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Hamline Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Valley 3 Eldridge 309

Description

In this performance session, four performers will present the lai of Marie de France entitled Chevrefoil, who revive the lai by using period music, new translations, and dramatic readings in the original language. As Joyce Coleman, Evelyn Birge Vitz, and others have argued, hearing a text read aloud or watching its performance both mirrors the way the work would have been consumed in the Middle Ages and enhances our modern understanding. Audiences regularly report that their perception of the work changes over the course of the session. The objective is to generate discussion about the use of voice, gesture, and music in the embodiment of the text – and how its performance reveals nuances of meaning that may be lost when read in silence on the page. Simonetta Cochis

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

Performances of Marie de France: Chevrefoil

Valley 3 Eldridge 309

In this performance session, four performers will present the lai of Marie de France entitled Chevrefoil, who revive the lai by using period music, new translations, and dramatic readings in the original language. As Joyce Coleman, Evelyn Birge Vitz, and others have argued, hearing a text read aloud or watching its performance both mirrors the way the work would have been consumed in the Middle Ages and enhances our modern understanding. Audiences regularly report that their perception of the work changes over the course of the session. The objective is to generate discussion about the use of voice, gesture, and music in the embodiment of the text – and how its performance reveals nuances of meaning that may be lost when read in silence on the page. Simonetta Cochis