Session Title

Personal Piety and Devotional Inscriptions in Byzantium

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

Organizer Name

Jonathan Shea

Organizer Affiliation

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

Presider Name

Lain Wilson

Presider Affiliation

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

Paper Title 1

Pious After Death: Byzantine Donor Inscriptions in Cappadocia

Presenter 1 Name

Elizabeth Zanghi

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. de Paris-Sorbonne

Paper Title 2

The Byzantine Signet Ring of John the Imperial Spatharios at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Presenter 2 Name

Brad Hostetler

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Kenyon College

Paper Title 3

Piety and Manuscripts in the Byzantine Era: Piety's Role in Preparing, Copying, and Protecting a Valuable Codex

Presenter 3 Name

Elias Petrou

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, Univ. of California-Irvine

Paper Title 4

Arabic-Language Shrouds and Christian Piety in Fatimid Egypt

Presenter 4 Name

Arielle Winnik

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Bryn Mawr College

Start Date

10-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 213

Description

In addition to written sources like letters, inscribed objects provide evidence for personal piety in monumental and miniature forms. The expressions of piety on these objects—including coins, seals, textiles, and reliquaries, as well as on architecture and art objects—inform patterns of individual and collective devotion. Used, worn, commissioned, and donated, these objects provide a window on the ways in which individuals at all social levels understood and presented their own piety. Although focusing on objects from Byzantium, this panel welcomes speakers working on materials from a comparative perspective. Nicole Eddy

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Personal Piety and Devotional Inscriptions in Byzantium

Bernhard 213

In addition to written sources like letters, inscribed objects provide evidence for personal piety in monumental and miniature forms. The expressions of piety on these objects—including coins, seals, textiles, and reliquaries, as well as on architecture and art objects—inform patterns of individual and collective devotion. Used, worn, commissioned, and donated, these objects provide a window on the ways in which individuals at all social levels understood and presented their own piety. Although focusing on objects from Byzantium, this panel welcomes speakers working on materials from a comparative perspective. Nicole Eddy