Author

Glick

Date of Award

12-1998

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Medieval Studies

First Advisor

Paul E. Szarmach

Second Advisor

Thomas H. Ohlgren

Third Advisor

Timothy C. Graham

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

The role of ideology in the creation of tenth- and eleventh-century Anglo-Saxon visual representations of Anglo-Saxon kings is the focus of this study. This study assesses Anglo-Saxon images in manuscripts and on coins, seals, and textiles produced during the tenth and eleventh centuries. Each image included depicts Anglo-Saxon kings who ruled during the tenth and eleventh centuries. The thesis begins with a discussion of the term ideology and a historical introduction to the political developments in rulership and monasticism that influenced images of kings. The thesis covers each art form separately, examining what evidence exists, what problems exist in dealing with this type of evidence, and what the evidence conveys about Anglo-Saxon ideology. While each medium investigated presents very different technical obstacles and modes of expression, all of the images share the characteristic that they influenced the ideology of the late Anglo-Saxon king in some way. Beyond that fact, this author concludes that Anglo-'Saxon monastic figures, particularly those involved in the reform movement, influenced the creation of the images, and the audiences' perception. Although not all images were created to intentionally persuade an audience, each used some degree of intensifying or diminishing persuasion.

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