Session Title

Curatorial Discourses on Medieval Art, Past and Present

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Lena Liepe; Noëlle Lynn Wenger Streeton

Organizer Affiliation

Linnéuniv.; Univ. i Oslo

Presider Name

Noëlle Lynn Wenger Streeton

Paper Title 1

Medieval Art in the National Museum of Denmark through Two Hundred Years

Presenter 1 Name

Poul Grinder-Hansen

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Nationalmuseet

Paper Title 2

The Rhetorics of Display: Sacred Objects at the Cleveland Museum of Art

Presenter 2 Name

Elina Gertsman

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Case Western Reserve Univ.

Paper Title 3

A Museum and a Place of Worship: How the Middle Ages Reemerged in Swedish Churches in the Early Twentieth Century

Presenter 3 Name

Henrik Widmark

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Uppsala Univ

Start Date

11-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1145

Description

The three papers in this session focus on, as one of the titles puts it, the rhetorics of display of medieval church art. Quite naturally the primary venues to be investigated are museums, but also churches doubling as exhibition spaces for ancient church objects no longer in use will be considered. The papers explore the strategies by which messages about the nature of medieval art have been – and still are – communicated to various audiences at various times, from the early 19th century to the present. Two of the papers deal specifically with curatorial discourses in a Scandinavian context, whereas the third paper takes as its case study the medieval collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Lena Liepe

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May 11th, 1:30 PM

Curatorial Discourses on Medieval Art, Past and Present

Schneider 1145

The three papers in this session focus on, as one of the titles puts it, the rhetorics of display of medieval church art. Quite naturally the primary venues to be investigated are museums, but also churches doubling as exhibition spaces for ancient church objects no longer in use will be considered. The papers explore the strategies by which messages about the nature of medieval art have been – and still are – communicated to various audiences at various times, from the early 19th century to the present. Two of the papers deal specifically with curatorial discourses in a Scandinavian context, whereas the third paper takes as its case study the medieval collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Lena Liepe