Session Title

Franciscan Women and Visual Imagination

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Women in the Franciscan Intellectual Tradition (WIFIT)

Organizer Name

Diane V. Tomkinson OSF

Organizer Affiliation

Neumann Univ.

Presider Name

Diane V. Tomkinson OSF

Paper Title 1

The Legend of Veronica and the Franciscan Construct of the Via Crucis

Presenter 1 Name

Katherine Tolmie Brown

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Walsh Univ.

Paper Title 2

Angela of Foligno and the Cultivation of Visionary Imagination

Presenter 2 Name

Joy A. Schroeder

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Capital Univ./Trinity Lutheran Seminary

Paper Title 3

Imaging the Perfect Virtuous Nun: Visual Culture and Caterina Vigri's Teaching of Poor Clare Novices

Presenter 3 Name

Kathleen G. Arthur

Presenter 3 Affiliation

James Madison Univ.

Start Date

10-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1720

Description

This session examines the visual forces that shaped and/or expressed Franciscan women’s religious experiences. Although their degree of literacy varied, medieval women in diverse forms of Franciscan life (lay and professed, active and contemplative) engaged non-literary sources that shaped and expressed their religious imaginations: including seeing and touching, creating or commissioning material devotional objects and religious images, participating in rituals and hearing sermons that stimulated the visual imagination, and using verbal imagery in ways that inspired subsequent visual images. The three papers in this session engage this topic from a range of perspectives, including the visual arts, textual accounts of visual imagination and ritual studies.

Signed: Diane V Tomkinson, OSF

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Franciscan Women and Visual Imagination

Sangren 1720

This session examines the visual forces that shaped and/or expressed Franciscan women’s religious experiences. Although their degree of literacy varied, medieval women in diverse forms of Franciscan life (lay and professed, active and contemplative) engaged non-literary sources that shaped and expressed their religious imaginations: including seeing and touching, creating or commissioning material devotional objects and religious images, participating in rituals and hearing sermons that stimulated the visual imagination, and using verbal imagery in ways that inspired subsequent visual images. The three papers in this session engage this topic from a range of perspectives, including the visual arts, textual accounts of visual imagination and ritual studies.

Signed: Diane V Tomkinson, OSF